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  • Ruby Nambo

Toxic Trauma


These last few months have been wild.

Everywhere you go,

there is always some sort of toxic chaos.

First, a pandemic:

filled with power and pain.

The power that leaves the world

to shut down in a rapid speed of days.

One day,

you could be surrounded

with your friends

in a gathering

having a good time—

singing and dancing

and eating lots of food—

the next day,

you are quarantine at your home

for months to come.


This pandemic has left

pain and tragic marks

on children to elderly

where birthdays and holidays

are celebrated online

and in-person graduations are cancelled—

which left millions in trauma.


A trauma that has left the vulnerable

being afraid to go outside

because of the virus.

Trauma where school children

despise online learning

and feel stuck in neutral.

Trauma in where many are unemployed

and will not get a stimulus check

from the government for multiple reasons.


And that inequity is a trauma itself!

No place is hiring

unless it is essential.

In fact,

that’s the where most of the trauma occur

and where more respect should occur

because without the essential,

survival would not exist.


Second, Black Lives Matter:

The race to justice is in demand.

Innocent lives are left to die

because of our police force.

The racism behind the badge

has left terror and fear

for the Black community.

And trust me,

this isn’t the first time

where our Black brothers and sisters

are living in fear.


They are tired,

they are overwhelmed,

and they are done with this trauma.

We are not living in America the Beautiful,

but instead living in America the Ugly.

Justice need to be fought

not with our hands

but with our lips

to say it loud

so the world could hear.

All lives are not going to matter

unless we are aware

we will never know

and experience their traumatic tragedy.




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